Bob Strong
REUTERS | Bob Strong

The Cabinet Office has recently released its latest quarterly statistics on information requests that 41 central government bodies have received under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 (EIR). The report makes interesting reading covering as it does the:

  • Initial handling of FOI requests.
  • Number of requests that have been received during the quarter from April to June 2016.
  • Timeliness of issuing a substantive response.
  • Rates of disclosure of requested information.
  • Exemptions that are applied when withholding information.

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Mathieu Belanger
REUTERS | Mathieu Belanger

The High Court in Watt v London Borough of Hackney and another [2016] EWHC 1978 has examined, in the context of a planning case, the circumstances in which a mistake of fact could constitute a ground for judicial review. The judgment also raises some interesting other issues; firstly, the failure by the solicitor instructed on behalf of the claimant to take on board the court’s advice that the matter was not one where an “ordinary” litigation approach was appropriate and, secondly, the costs consequences that flowed from the court’s decision. Although the claimant succeeded in her application that the planning permission granted by the council should be quashed, the court held that she was not entitled to her costs until 27 April 2016, the date of the hearing at which her case was recast as a mistake of fact. Continue reading

Dylan Martinez
REUTERS | Dylan Martinez

This is the latest in our series of quarterly local government update blogs, which will enable readers to catch up on the most important cases, issues or developments in local government from February to April 2016.

Please feel free to submit a comment below or send us an Ask query if you have any views on the cases, issues, or legal developments covered or if you think we have missed something that should be brought to the attention of local government practitioners.

In this post we look at:

  • Cases of interest to local authorities.
  • Other developments of interest to local authority lawyers.

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Paulo Whitaker
REUTERS | Paulo Whitaker

This is part two of the public children law update blog to give readers a snapshot of the important cases, issues and developments from May 2016 to August 2016. The remaining topic to be covered from part one, is that of transparency.  Other interesting cases of note will also be covered. Please feel free to submit a comment below or send us an Ask query if you have any views on the cases, issues, or legal developments that are covered or if you think we have missed something that should be brought to the attention of child care law practitioners. Continue reading

Aly Song
REUTERS | Aly Song

This is the latest in our series of quarterly adult social care update blogs giving readers a snapshot of the most important cases, issues or developments in adult social care. This post looks at developments from May 2016 to August 2016. Please feel free to submit a comment below or send us an Ask query if you have any views on the cases, issues, or legal developments that are covered or if you think we have missed something that should be brought to the attention of adult social care practitioners.

In this post we look at:

  • Legislative developments.
  • Recent case law.
  • Government consultations.
  • Government guidance and policy statements.
  • Local Government Ombudsman decisions.

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Darren Staples
REUTERS | Darren Staples

The Administrative Court’s summer recess presents a welcome opportunity for public law practitioners to consolidate recent case law developments in judicial review.

A short but interesting judgment concerning costs and the court’s assessment of success in judicial review proceedings was the Court of Appeal’s (CoA) decision in Rashid v London Borough of Merton [2016] EWCA Civ 622, handed down on 10 May 2016. The case may serve to focus minds both on the potential effects of interim orders on costs and the importance of a robust response to an interim order application. The perceived “concession” of the relief secured by an interim order, even where the respondent indicated that it would later resist the order, had significant costs consequences in this case. Continue reading